Hal Turner’s Amero sample

December 31, 2008

Hal Turner is a former New York talk radio show host. In this video, the outspoken, controversial Turner warns of the imminent collapse of the US dollar as currency, to be replaced by the Amero. To further substantiate his claims, Turner shows an amero coin, and  calls this “the biggest looting by the moneychangers in the history of the world”.

If this currency collapse comes about,  Canada and Mexico will also be affected, as the Amero would be the common currency of our NAU, similar to what transpired in Europe with the formation of the EU and the Euro.

While I do not agree with Hal Turner’s ideology and his bigotry, his  video and  blog posts about this topic deserve merit.

Watch video here: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=1954933468700958565&hl=es

Hal Turner’s blog: Hal Turner Show

Read Hal Turner’s blog post titled Confirmed: US government will collapse before summer* 2009; will repudiate national debt; issue new currency and devalue “old dollar” by 90%here.


Integrate This! – SPP Watch Update

August 2, 2008

SPP Watch

SPP WATCH makes the links between daily news items, new government initiatives and the ongoing Security and Prosperity Partnership talks between Canada, Mexico and the United States. As well as regular SPP updates, we will continue to post new reports, interviews and multimedia presentations critical of what is sometimes called the “deep integration” of North America.

The Integrate This website will slow down over the summer as staff take their annual vacations and as Stuart Trew, the Council of Canadians researcher/writer who has been administering the site’s content, heads to Toronto to become the Council’s regional organizer for Ontario-Québec. We will continue to post news articles and important reports but not as frequently as we have been over the past eight months.

Harper launches major assault on food safety, fires government scientist; regulatory harmonization blamed
The extent of Harper’s current assault on Canada’s food and drug inspection system is about to dwarf any previous concerns we had with the regulatory harmonization of pesticide residues. The Prime Minister is simultaneously eliminating funding for BSE testing for Canadian producers, offloading federal research facilities to the private sector and academia, and firing government scientists who dare stand up against this widespread deregulation for the sake of corporate profits.

What’s good for U.S. energy security is good for the SPP
A recent U.S. statement confirms the ongoing push for greater North American energy integration that leaves Canada wide open for the worst of an energy gold rush.   In addressing the Subcommittee of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs in Washington DC, Daniel Sullivan (Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of Economic, Energy, and Business Affairs) calls for more energy integration and dependence on market-based solutions in the face of rising oil and gas prices and the havoc this is wreaking on the U.S. economy.

Majority of Canadians would renegotiate NAFTA, says Angus Reid poll
You’d never know it from the lengths our federal and provincial governments are going to in defence of NAFTA, but most Canadians think we should renegotiate the free trade and investment pact, says a new poll by Angust Reid.

Plan Mexico, SPP about “armouring NAFTA,” says Avi Lewis
Journalist and human rights activist Avi Lewis, commented on Plan Mexico and the Security and Prosperity Partnership this week on U.S. radio program Democracy Now.

Put on the EDL brakes
From the speed at which provinces are introducing so-called enhanced driver’s licences, you’d think they were a universally acclaimed technology (Passport Alternative Approved In Sask. – B.C. and online editions, July 31). But as a public forum in Toronto this month showed, there is much skepticism among Canada’s privacy commissioners, consumer groups and the public.

Industry Week magazine contrasts European vs. SPP approach to chemicals regulation
A new article in Industry Week magazine offers an interesting and brief explanation of Europe’s new chemicals regulation laws (the Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH) legislation), and how they differ from the North American approach being developed through the Security and Prosperity Partnership.

“Any harsh treatment endured by Khadr is Canada’s responsibility,” says lawyer Kuebler
As reported by CTV this week, new documents and video footage “suggest Canada was aware of the harsh treatment that Canadian terror suspect Omar Khadr was being subjected to in Guantanamo Bay at the hands of U.S. military interrogators.” But Prime Minister Harper still says the government knew nothing and has no intention of interfering, or in asking that Khadr be allowed to return to Canada.

For more information on the SPP, please visit www.IntegrateThis.ca.


Council of Canadians E-News – Stop freshwater lakes from becoming toxic waste dumps

July 26, 2008

This is the July E-Newsletter from the Council of Canadians posted here for those who do not receive it:

Stop freshwater lakes from becoming toxic waste dumps

The Council of Canadians has joined with environmental, First Nations and social justice organizations to stop the Harper government’s plan to allow mining companies to use Canadian freshwater lakes as dumping grounds for toxic mine wastes.

Although it is illegal under the federal Fisheries Act to dump toxic material into fish-habitated waters, mining companies have been given a loophole under the government-amended Metal Mining Effluent Regulation (MMER). The federal government is now able to reclassify lakes and other freshwater bodies as “tailing impoundment areas” and can permit mining companies to dump toxic wastes there, destroying the natural habitat forever.

Environment Canada recently announced that under the MMER at least 11 mines in Canada are seeking permission to destroy healthy natural water bodies with their mine waste. Eight of these mining projects are being considered in 2008. The lakes include prime fishing areas and natural watersheds from B.C. to Newfoundland.

The Council of Canadians is calling on the federal government to require mining companies to use existing technologies for managing mine waste, or to invest in new technologies that do not result in the pollution of local watersheds.

Allowing mining companies to use lakes as waste dump sites amounts to a massive subsidy to the mining industry at the expense of publicly owned fresh water resources. The mining industry made a net profit of more than $80 billion in North America in 2007. After the companies’ profits are made, it will be the surrounding communities that will be left with the effects of the damage. Once toxic mine wastes are added to the water, the environmental damage cannot be undone.

“Allowing a lake to be turned into a dump site for a private company is nothing short of privatizing a public resource that is essential to life. Contaminating a water body will have devastating consequences on entire watersheds at a time when the world is dealing with a fresh water crisis,” says Maude Barlow, National Chairperson of the Council of Canadians.

For more information about this issue, or to take action by sending a letter to Environment Minister John Baird, please go here.
Here’s more about what’s new at the Council of Canadians:


WIN! War resisters find support from majority of Parliament: resisters still face deportation

Supporters of U.S. war resisters claimed victory last month when, by a vote of 137 to 110, federal Opposition parties in the House of Commons adopted a recommendation that, if implemented, would make it possible for U.S. Iraq War resisters to obtain permanent resident status in Canada.

The recommendation was adopted by a majority of Members of Parliament from the Liberal, Bloc Québécois, and New Democratic parties, while Conservative MPs voted against the motion.

The victory was short-lived, however, as U.S. army deserter Robin Long was deported back to his army base in Fort Knox, Kentucky on July 15, making him the first resister to the U.S. war effort in Iraq to be sent out of Canada. The 25-year-old was unable to sway a Canadian court of the danger he faced if he was forced to return to the United States.

Council of Canadians chapter activist and Board member Bob Ages spoke with The Globe and Mail about the issues saying, “I was just shocked at some things in (the) ruling. It just flies in the face of everything that we and every Canadian know about the reality of what is going on… (Mr. Long’s deportation would be a) terrible precedent for Canada, especially given our history of providing sanctuary for war resisters, over 100,000 draft dodgers and deserters during the Vietnam era…This will be the first time Canada played gendarme to the American military.”

Many Council members and chapters have joined the campaign to ensure that U.S. war resisters seeking refuge from militarism and an illegal war can stay safely in Canada.

While the vote has been characterized as a “non-binding resolution” of the House of Commons, the Council of Canadians believes it is incumbent on the Harper government to listen to the democratic will of MPs and take action on the issue.

For more information about the Council of Canadians’ support for the War Resister campaign go here.


One man’s mission to raise awareness about the SPP

Caution - Nafta at Work
Go here to read more about how Canadians feel about deeper integration through the SPP

Caution - Nafta at Work
Go here to read the latest issue of Canadian Perspectives

Don Parker has travelled many kilometres to raise awareness.

Concerned about the lack of information the general public has received about the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America (SPP) and the Trade, Investment and Labour Mobility Agreement (TILMA), Mr. Parker recently contacted the Council of Canadians and purchased 3,000 copies of the Council’s recent report Not Counting Canadians: The Security and Prosperity Partnership and public opinion. Since May he has been visiting municipal and school board offices near his Toronto home to deliver copies of the report. He believes that raising public awareness is key to effecting change.

“If we want Canada to remain Canadian, we must learn more,” he explains. “There have been seminars involving university students from (Mexico, Canada and the United States) who have been meeting together to learn how to think North American? If we are to stop this slippery slide down (…), we must do it from an informed basis.”

Mr. Parker, who is a writer for the independent Dialogue Magazine, and very active Council supporter and member, is particularly concerned about making sure youth also start to think about issues affecting Canada. He has spoken with school board representatives about getting Council of Canadians’ material into high school lesson plans. He also regularly delivers copies of the Council’s magazine, Canadian Perspectives, around his community.

Mr. Parker encourages others to get involved and take action by writing letters and making phone calls to Members of Parliament and provincial politicians, writing letters to the editor of local newspapers, and forming discussion groups to plan actions. “I encourage people to join the Council of Canadians and support them, bearing in mind that membership alone is not nearly enough; there must be positive action,” he says.

To read the report Not Counting Canadians: The Security and Prosperity Partnership and public opinion go here.
To read the latest issue of Canadian Perspectives go here.


Join the Council of Canadians today!

The strength of the Council is in its membership. The Council does not accept funding from corporations or from governments, so membership donations are vital to our activities. We work with community groups, seniors, students, unions and other organizations across the country to promote progressive policies on public health care, fair trade, clean water and other issues of social and economic concern to Canadians. Join the Council today, and help us prove that a better Canada is possible.


Intel Strike: Bill C-51, Codex and the SPP

June 23, 2008

This excellent commentary by Dana Gabriel was posted on Intel Strike on June 19th, 2008. It accurately explains Bill C-51, its ramifications for users of herbal supplements and vitamins, and its blending with the SPP agenda. Bill C-51 would bring sweeping changes to our Canadian Food and Drugs Act.

Outlawing vitamins while fast-tracking potentially dangerous new pharmaceuticals? This is outrageous!

On April 8, 2008, Canada’s Health Minister introduced Bill C-51 which proposed sweeping changes to the Food and Drugs Act. The Canadian government has since been forced to make amendments because of intense grassroots pressure. There are fears that this Bill could lead to some vitamins, herbs, minerals, and dietary supplements no longer being available in the country. Through the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP), Canada, the U.S., and Mexico are already busy harmonizing food and drug regulations into a North American Union structure. Some have suggested that this Bill would also bring Canadian law into compliance with the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Bill C-51 has the potential to take away the rights of people to freely choose natural medicine as an alternative to expensive drug-based products and treatments.

Bill C-51 will further encroach on civil liberties and increase police state measures. There is reason for concern because of the Bills ambiguous language in regards to raids and seizures. It has been referred to as a police state bill masquerading as a health bill. It will make it easier for Canadian officials to seize natural health products and remove them from store shelves. It grants inspectors the power to raid homes and businesses without a warrant and the power to seize bank accounts and property. Some might recall that in the early 90’s, the FDA engaged in paramilitary raids on American health food stores, holistic treatment centers, and other nutritional supplement businesses. This behavior created such a public outcry and backlash, leading Congress to pass the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) to protect the right of American consumers to purchase and use nutritional supplements.

If the Harper Conservative government thought that they were going to quietly pass Bill C-51, were they ever wrong. When word hit the Internet and blogoshere that up to 60% of natural health products currently sold in Canada could be outlawed, it sparked a swift and strong public reaction. In Bill C-51, the word drug has been replaced with “therapeutic products” and gives the government broad reaching powers to further regulate their sale. Health Minister Tony Clement has vowed to change the parts that lumped natural medicines in with pharmaceutical drugs. This includes a clearer definition of natural health products into the Food and Drugs Act. There has been other amendments made, but there are still many concerns surrounding Bill C-51. It might be safer to do away with it in its entirety and start from scratch.

It is the SPP working groups that are harmonizing regulations and laws, writing out policy initiatives and recommendations. They are the real power, laying the foundation for a North American Union. Part of the SPP calls for the “Identification and appropriate adoption of best practices in maintaining the safety, efficacy and quality of pharmaceutical products.” NDP MP Peter Julian said in the House of Commons that, “Bill C-51 would limit access to many health products and allow the fast-tracking of new drugs that have not been proven safe. Bill C-51 blends in with the SPP agenda, which is about harmonizing regulations across the board with the United States, resulting in lower standards.” There are fears that Bill C-51 will bring about a more U.S. style approach to food, drugs, and consumer product safety. This includes turning more power over to the drug companies with increased reliance on their testing and research. These same drug manufacturers would themselves be more responsible in fast-tracking the drug approval process and further looking after any safety concerns once the drug has hit the market. Under the Trilateral Cooperation Charter, the FDA is also working with Canada and Mexico in further harmonizing regulations between the three countries.

It is not just through the SPP and the Trilateral Cooperation Charter that the harmonizing of food and drugs is being achieved. The Codex Alimentarius Commission which is part of the United Nations is setting international guidelines for food products including dietary supplements. They are using muscle provided by the World Trade Organization to undermine and bypass domestic laws. Section Six of CAFTA talks about using the Codex codes as the regulatory standard for all signing nations. It is through the Codex guidelines that vitamins, minerals, and other natural supplements could become limited and even banned. Some fear that Bill C-51 is an attempt to place Canada under Codex control.

Many argue that Bill C-51 is unnecessary, and that there are already laws in place to protect consumers from natural health products. It’s not about keeping Canadians safe, it’s about further harmonizing our health and safety regulations into a North American Union. How can fast-tracking potentially dangerous new drugs and at the same time outlawing some beneficial natural medicines be good for anyone? One must understand that it is also about ensuring huge profits for Big Pharma. Bill C-51 should be rejected on the grounds that it threatens the ability of Canadians to choose alternative health products and treatments.

STOP Bill C-51 — Sign the PETITION: http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/stopbillc-51/


IntegrateThis! – SPP Watch Update

June 7, 2008

SPP Watch

SPP WATCH makes the links between daily news items, new government initiatives and the ongoing Security and Prosperity Partnership talks between Canada, Mexico and the United States. As well as regular SPP updates, we will continue to post new reports, interviews and multimedia presentations critical of what is sometimes called the “deep integration” of North America. The site is updated regularly so visit often.

Canada’s beef industry wants to adopt weaker U.S. feed ban rules
According to a Canadian Press article this week, Canada’s beef industry is pressuring the Canadian government to adopt weaker U.S. feed ban rules. (more…)

Ontario working on provincial ID card with Homeland Security approval
Mere weeks after learning that Quebec will be producing “enhanced driver’s licences” (EDLs) by years end to cooperate with U.S. border security demands, Canadian Press reports this week that Ontario will offer similar provincial ID cards for non drivers. (more…)

Premiers Charest and Doer to address 2008 NASCO conference; progress made to Ontario-Quebec trade corridor
Quebec  Premier Jean Charest will give the closing address to the 2008 NASCO conference starting today in Guanajuato, central Mexico, and is expected to describe his vision for continental economic integration, according to La Presse canadienne today. Manitoba Premier Gary Doer will give an opening address to the conference, giving the annual meeting to discuss North American trade corridors a distinctly Canadian feel. (more…)

B.C.-Washington State “enhanced driver’s licences” are “very invasive,” says Ontario privacy official; Province to hold public hearings July 16
According to the Montreal Gazette today, “While Quebec’s privacy commission is being kept in the dark on a proposed enhanced driver’s licence (EDL), or Permis de conduire plus, Ontario’s Information and Privacy commissioner, who has been part of the EDL process in that province since 2006, is calling a public forum on the issue for July 16.” (more…)

NAFTA+ business plans hurting Mexican workers, says journalist
An essay in the Fort Worth, Texas Star-Telegram this weekend by Mexican journalist Anne Vigna describes the impact NAFTA has had on workers in her country. While uglier than Canada’s free-trade history with the United States, the reality is similar in many ways. (more…)

Does Ignatieff support a Canadian energy strategy?
In his Globe and Mail column today, Lawrence Martin asks how much sense it makes that “energy-abundant” Canada imports 40 per cent of its oil from foreign markets. He also reports that Liberal Michael Ignatieff is wondering the same thing. (more…)

For more information on the SPP, please visit www.IntegrateThis.ca.